The ubiquitous face mask does more than protect against viral spread; it also changes the way we look at one another—and thus symbolizes the mystery of customer behavior in the pandemic. Several new McKinsey research efforts analyze the changes taking place in the homes of consumers, on their phones, and in stores. “Reimagining marketing in the next normal,” for example, documents six of the biggest shifts emerging from COVID-19. One of the most intriguing is the rising importance of neighborhoods: with travel largely shut down, marketers must figure out how to localize their outreach.

SOURCE: Mc Kinsey

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The pandemic has focused attention on how dependent we all are on what happens in other parts of the world for the products we use every day. As businesses look to reinvigorate their operations after the crisis, current innovations in sustainability certification can help build more resilient supply chains through a stronger focus on continuous improvement, transparency and shared responsibility. Here are three ways to do just that.

SOURCE: World Economic Forum

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Many businesses in Africa have discovered new ways to bring goods and services to their clients during the COVID-19 lockdown. Both big and small entrepreneurs stand to benefit from online trade after the pandemic.

SOURCE: DW

Image credit: alliance/dpa/G.Jun

The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly changed consumer behaviours and needs. Several Caribbean firms have strategically repositioned themselves to successfully access new opportunities that have arisen as a result of these evolving trends.  Review the various strategies your company can use to identify your opportunity.

SOURCE: Carib Export

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Brands need to focus on hyper-localisation by connecting with consumers where they are, as Covid-19 has dramatically changed consumer behavior and altered the path-to-purchase, according to Facebook and Boston Consulting Group.

SOURCE: The Drum

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Financial Vanguard investigations have revealed that key corporate institutions are now restructuring their business models to create more resilient operations, less vulnerable to any form of restriction to formal office settings and workstations. They are headed towards institutionalizing work-from-home or virtual office, while seamlessly interfacing with customers and creating more value at less cost.

SOURCE: All Africa

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The coronavirus pandemic has placed considerable strain on small and medium sized food producers. Many have responded with ‘inspiring, creative and innovative’ solutions. REFRAME takes us on a tour of how SMEs in the North Sea region have adjusted their business models.

SOURCE: Food Navigator

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There’s a proverb that goes: “The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The next best time is right now.” The naturally vulnerable Small to Medium Enterprise (SME) and entrepreneur sector would have done well to build their resilience prior to COVID-19. But if they didn’t, as with so many, right now is the time to plant the seeds for short, medium and long-term resilience.

SOURCE: World Economic Forum

Image credit: REUTERS/Eva Plevie

Nestlé has mobilised its brands, supply chain, distribution and retail partners to launch a comprehensive global COVID-19 response.

This is in addition to the company’s initial donation of CHF10 million (US$1.4 million) to the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC) and Red Crescent Societies.

SOURCE: The Moodie Davitt Report

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“ADM is committed to doing our part not only to keep our colleagues and their families safe, but also to support the hundreds of global communities where we live and work,” said Juan Luciano, chairman and chief executive officer (CEO) of ADM. “We appreciate the hard work of the medical professionals, first responders and government and community leaders on the front line during this difficult time.”

SOURCE: Holly Demaree-Saddler