In line with the UN approach to “build back better” post COVID-19, and in pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the new programme aims to mitigate the immediate impacts of the pandemic while strengthening the longer-term resilience of food systems and livelihoods. “We cannot employ a ‘business as usual’ approach anymore,” highlighted FAO Director-General QU Dongyu in his opening remarks, adding that “We must work very hard to limit COVID-19’s damaging effects on food security and nutrition. We need to be more country-driven, innovative and work closely hand in hand. This is how FAO has built its COVID-19 comprehensive response and recovery programme, and today we are asking you to join us.”

SOURCE: FAO

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The Abu Dhabi Fund for Development will grant debt relief to low-income countries and companies from the developing world as the UAE backs a G20 plan to support economies grappling with the fallout from the Covid-19 pandemic. The fund said that it will suspend principal and interest repayments for eligible countries and businesses upon “request for forbearance”.

SOURCE: The National

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The UK Government will match the first £5 million of donations from the British public to the Disasters Emergency Committee’s (DEC) Coronavirus Appeal, International Development Secretary Anne-Marie Trevelyan announced on Tuesday 14 July. Money raised from the appeal will boost the work of 14 leading British charities, helping some of the world’s most vulnerable people deal with the pandemic, especially those living in refugee camps who have escaped from warzones.

SOURCE: UK Government

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After the volume of merchandise trade shrank by 3% year-on-year in the first quarter, estimates for the second quarter – when lockdown measures affected the largest share of the global population – show a drop of 18.5%. “These declines are historically large, but could have been much worse,” the WTO says on its website. The organization’s April forecast predicted trade could fall by 32% in a worst-case scenario. Even so, there are risks to the outlook, including a second wave of COVID‑19, weaker economic growth, and governments imposing trade restrictions.

SOURCE. World Economic Forum

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The ubiquitous face mask does more than protect against viral spread; it also changes the way we look at one another—and thus symbolizes the mystery of customer behavior in the pandemic. Several new McKinsey research efforts analyze the changes taking place in the homes of consumers, on their phones, and in stores. “Reimagining marketing in the next normal,” for example, documents six of the biggest shifts emerging from COVID-19. One of the most intriguing is the rising importance of neighborhoods: with travel largely shut down, marketers must figure out how to localize their outreach.

SOURCE: Mc Kinsey

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According to the food sector related to industry workers, they do not have the opportunity to work from home and are required to continue to work in their usual workplaces. Keeping all workers healthy and safe in the food manufacturing plant and supply chain is critical to surviving the current pervasive. Maintaining the transportation of food is an essential function to which all stakeholders along the food chain need to contribute. This is also required to maintain trust and consumer stratification in the safety and availability of food.

SOURCE: FNB News

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The pandemic has focused attention on how dependent we all are on what happens in other parts of the world for the products we use every day. As businesses look to reinvigorate their operations after the crisis, current innovations in sustainability certification can help build more resilient supply chains through a stronger focus on continuous improvement, transparency and shared responsibility. Here are three ways to do just that.

SOURCE: World Economic Forum

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The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) has joined other multilateral development banks and the World Trade Organization (WTO) in a drive to provide urgently needed support for trade during the coronavirus crisis. The pandemic has led to a devastating economic downturn. International trade has been affected by a reduction in the supply of trade finance. Insufficient trade finance threatens to compromise otherwise-viable trade transactions.

SOURCE: European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

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The Department for International Trade is reviewing its trade modelling to ensure that all of Britain’s new trade deals are specifically tailored to shape the country’s economy as it recovers from the impacts of Coronavirus. Modelling trade is an important part of the Department for International Trade’s negotiation capability. Given the significant global impact of Coronavirus, it’s an appropriate time for DIT to review its trade models, as free trade agreements will play a crucial role in our economic recovery.

SOURCE: UK Department of Foreign Trade

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The United Nations (UN) Deputy Secretary-General Amina Mohammed convened and opened the Recover Better Together Action Forum this morning. Over 300 participants, 40 speakers, including Ministers of Finance, International Cooperation and Foreign Affairs, ambassadors and partners from the private sector and civil society shared their experience in dealing with the socio-economic effects of COVID-19 and committed to recover better from the crisis. Heads of UN agencies, funds and programmes and Resident Coordinators leading the UN’s COVID-19 response and recovery on the ground also articulated the UN’s offer across different dimensions of the COVID-19 response and shared early results of the UN’s work with national and local authorities to protect lives and livelihoods.

SOURCE: CNBC Africa